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To be sure, Millennials remain the most likely of any generation to self-identify as liberals; they are less supportive than their elders of an assertive national security policy and more supportive of a progressive domestic social agenda.They are still more likely than any other age group to identify as Democrats.

Moreover, after decades of low voter participation by the young, the turnout gap in 2008 between voters under and over the age of 30 was the smallest it had been since 18- to 20-year-olds were given the right to vote in 1972.

() But the political enthusiasms of Millennials have since cooled -for Obama and his message of change, for the Democratic Party and, quite possibly, for politics itself.

Two-thirds say “you can’t be too careful” when dealing with people.

Yet they are less skeptical than their elders of government.

This is a far higher share than was the case in earlier generations.) Millennials are on course to become the most educated generation in American history, a trend driven largely by the demands of a modern knowledge-based economy, but most likely accelerated in recent years by the millions of 20-somethings enrolling in graduate schools, colleges or community colleges in part because they can’t find a job.

Among 18 to 24 year olds a record share — 39.6% — was enrolled in college as of 2008, according to census data. Looking back at their teenage years, Millennials report having had fewer spats with mom or dad than older adults say they had with their own parents when they were growing up.

Yet not belonging does not necessarily mean not believing.

Millennials pray about as often as their elders did in their own youth.

() Politically, Millennials were among Barack Obama’s strongest supporters in 2008, backing him for president by more than a two-to-one ratio (66% to 32%) while older adults were giving just 50% of their votes to the Democratic nominee.

This was the largest disparity between younger and older voters recorded in four decades of modern election day exit polling.

They’re less religious, less likely to have served in the military, and are on track to become the most educated generation in American history.

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