Dating relating emc 10n directory

• Have the students discuss the situation in groups * of four, with each student assuming the role of a family member. High School TLevel The exercises in this section are designed for students at the high school level! Maxi Wardrobe at Mini Cost (Home Economics Learning Package #1034). At thv middle school and junior high school levels, learners will be able to: Identify ways in which personal interests and activities influence food choices.

Sue bought for'schopl an outfit that- cost ; mother was planning to have a permanent; Xgn^Cieeds new jeans and shoes for school; and "father wants aniewsweater. Consumer Informa- tion, Public Documents Distribution Center, Pueblo, CO 81009,1974. Relate the ability to manage resources to satisfac- tion and goal achievement In foods. - NTENT ORGANIZERS Use ava JWble-resourees— to- beeome— the— kind-of- person you want to be.

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227 Performance Objectives for the Consumer Emphasis The Consumer 228 The Consumer in the Marketplace 232 The Consumer in the Community ; 240 Instructional Strategies It's Your Decision „ 250 Shopping Spree 255 Career Choice 257 ^Payday : 260 It's Your Money 265 Buy Now, Pay Later 272 Summons and Complaint 275 We Regret That ' 277 Try It, You'll Like It 279 Where Does Your Money Go? Search This exercise is designed to help students assess . • Have the students, find three garments in their wardrobes with care labels that require different care. « v Use decorative stitching and fabric scraps to renew the garments. "The Textile Scene"' (Kit C, fflmstrip and" trans- parency). Interpret ways in which a desire to participate in the dominant culture may modify food patterns.

224 CONSUMER EMPHASIS/MANAGEMENT OF FINANCES, RESOURCES, AND SERVICES . Assess ways in which 1975 FDA regulations will protect the consumers. Have the students bring problem garments to class or describe the difficulty : Diagnose the problem. 9 ERLC o J • Have the students organize a recycling clinic for "tired" clothes: Bring to class Levi's or other garments which are Tio longer wearable. Evaluate the role of family food customs in preserving and' transmitting cultural, ethnic, and religious traditions.

* ; 1 35 Do Your Own Thing 137 Shopping for Credit 140 To Recycle or Not . ^ ; 149 Suggested Learning Experiences 152 Supplementary Resources «. ; 158 CONSUMER EMPHASIS/HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY RELATIONS. » 46 Bring an article of clothing they dislike or never wear. Textile Industry Product Safety Committee, 1750 Pennsylvania Ave., N. Analyze modifications they have made in their eating patterns because of social relationships.

Personality ' 'White Elephdn t ' 1 Fair , This exercise is designed to help students relate the recycling, of clothing to^ conservation and extension" of resources. Have the students do the following: ■ ■ Set up booths in the' classroom to suggest a fair or- bazaar. Eye Gate House, 146-01 Archer Ave., Jamaica, NY 11435, 1972 ($*5.50 each). Kit, Textile Industry Product Safety Committee, 1750 Pennsylvania Ave., N. Fabric Flammability: What the Consumer Should Know (pamphlet). Consumer Information, Public Documents Distribution Center, Pueblo, CO 81009,1974. Analyze ways in which food customs and patterns of eating reflect family background, ethnic and cultural origin, and religious tradition.

• Have students collect pictures of people that illustrate a variety of patterns of dress arid speculate on the life-styles of the individuals pictured. Ecology of a Dress Bulletin Board "Finding What's Right for You" (#2), "Putting It Together So It Works" (#5), "Doing It All on a Budget" (#6), Looking Great on a Shoestring (filmstrips and cassettes). At the high school level, learners will be able to: Explore ways in which food selection and service can express a desired life-style.

Clothing Reflects Life-Style This exercise is designed to help students ex- amine ways in which clothing reflects the life-style of the individual. " Perfo rmance Objectives for the Consumer Emphasis CONTENT ORGANIZERS Use available resources to shape a desired life-style.

****** j 0 ^ CONSUMER EMPHASIS/HOUSING AND HOME FURNISHINGS 107 Performance Objectives for the Consumer Emphasis The Consumer i gg The Consumer in the Marketplace ..;......[[ 112 The Consumer in the Community 1 20 9 ERLC Instructional Strategies The Real Thing . Explore reasons /Why things that one person discards may appeal to someone else. Community College and Adult Education " The exercises included in this section are de- signed for students at the community college and adult levels. Discover ways in which to fulfill nutritional needs within the pattern of peer group food preferences. Council of Better Business Bureaus, Inc., IT 50 17th St., N.

161 Performance Objectives for the Consumer Emphasis The Consumer 162 The Consumer in the Marketplace 1 1 66 The Consumer in the Community 1 74 Instructional Strategies A Picture of Me . Auction, sell, or trade their "misfits." They may want to use the "sales pitch" or "appeal" that trapped them into buying the various itetfns. Arrange to have unsold items taken to eom- ^ munity recycling centers. Interpret the effects of current trends toward the use of natural and unprocessed foods on food patterns of individuals. Mobile- Monies: Flow to Choose, Where to Put, How to Finance.

215 Shopping for Services 217 Suggested Learning Experiences . Sue's family has to spend far clothing this .ynotlth. Reading the Labels on Apparel and Household Textiles (pamphlet #048C). American Textile Manufacturer's Institute, Inc., 1501 Johnston BIdg., Charlotte, NC 28202 (free). Analyze the effect of availability and nature of resources on the range of choices available to n\eet individual and family food needs.

Ha Ve each student do the following: Identify the garment. Make accessories from usable parts of the garments. Ask students to find places in the community • that collect used clothing: Who operates them? Family Resources This exercise is designed to help students con- " sider the effect of the use of family resources for clothing, for individuals on other family members. Celanese Fibers Marketing Co., 525 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10136. AVAILABLE CONSUMER RESOURCES Relate the accurate perception and creative use of food resources to the ability to meet social, psychological, and physiological needs.

What effect will Sue's purchase have on the wants and needs of the others? • Ha Ve the students relate job requirements con- v cerning appearance and appropriate dress to the range of choice in making Nothing decisions. Con- sumer Information, Public Documents Distribu- tion Center, Pueblo, CO 81009, 1971. Examine the influence of peers on personal food choices.

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