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The pronunciation of the original word, paepo'o, was altered, and now even the spelling is changed to paipo. Published by Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1977. He notes that while it's true that "paepo" can be translated as "night landing" (as noted in the mo‘olelo by Alfred Solomon), Clark has since learned that the original word was actually "pae po'o".Today "to paipo" means to go bodysurfing with a "bellyboard." The board itself is called a paipo board."Source: page 9 in The Beaches of O'ahu, By John R. The following is from the manuscript: In the earliest descriptions of surfboards by Hawaiian scholars, the smallest boards, those that were shorter than six feet in length, were generically called papa li`ili`i, or "small boards." During the early 1900s, the name papa li`ili`i was changed on two fronts with non-Hawaiian surfers calling them bellyboards, because they were most often ridden prone, the rider laying on his or her "belly," and with Hawaiian surfers in Waikiki calling them pae po`o boards. It does not appear in any Hawaiian dictionaries, Hawaiian language newspapers, or writings of the prominent Hawaiian scholars of the 1800s, such as `I`i, Kamakau, Kepelino, and Malo, who described traditional Hawaiian surf sports.He is also an avid bodysurfer and one of the founding fathers of the Sandy Beach Bodysurfing Championships in 1972, and was the head judge (and a competitor) until 1989. During the early 1900s, the term paepo'o was commonly used in Waikīkī, and it meant riding a wave with only the body.

For a similar image of a surfrider holding a paipo, see this very different board. This Hawaiian paipo surf rider is most likely a woman most of us would agree. Surf historians of the 20th Century often stated that paipo boarding was for children and adults rode foot boards. The image on the right appears in: Margan, F., & Ben R. Have a look at these little guys zooming in on those little pieces of plywood. Also check how shallow the water is." Source: Jan Messersmith, posted on 2009/08/24/, and accessed on 6/17/2012, from the his blog "Madang - Ples Bilong Mi".

"But a diversion the most common is upon the Water, where there is a very great Sea, and surf breaking on the Shore.

In everyday conversation, pae po`o was often shortened to pae po, which is common among Hawaiian words that end with double "o's," such as Napo`opo`o on the island of Hawai`i, which is often pronounced Napopo.

The popular spelling used today, paipo, was coined by Hawaiian surfing legend Wally Froiseth, who, besides being an excellent surfer, was an exceptional paipo board rider who was famous for standing on his twin-fin board while riding big waves.

SH&CC Caption: One of Laird Hamilton's hydrofoil boards, a Dyno kneeboard, a '70s Victoria Skimboard, a '60s "Paipo" bellyboard, a Hawaiian plywood, fiberglass and resin paipo, a balsa twinfin bellyboard, some swim fins (including 1 of Mark Cunningham's), a Mc Donald's tray, a canvas mat (good for rashes from neck to knees), an early Boogie Board, a Hawaiian bellyboard (popular with visiting tourists in the '30s, '40s & '50s), and a Peruvian Caballito de Totora. Looks like a foam/glass board and the rider is wearing a pair of Da Fins swim fins and paddling gloves. Jeff Chamberlain test riding his newest board, "Mega Platter," one of many in his paipo experimentation adventure.

Unidentified paipo surfer at Maria's Point, Rincn, Puerto Rico, March 18, 2016.

Photograph courtesy of Malcolm Gault-Williams, from the chapter, Wallace "Wally" Froiseth: Legendary Hot Curl Surfer, in Legendary Surfers: A Definitive History of Surfing's Culture and Heroes, By Malcolm Gault-Williams.

Updated: 10 April 2005, accessed on the Internet on June 19, 2009.

SI was born on September 15, 1905, and I'm a cousin of Bill Sproat... They're two small concave boards about 1/4-inch by 1 foot by 3 feet made of wiliwili, and they were used for spying.

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