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And what's worse, the constant worry and fear associated with anxiety can make it even more difficult to come.

English women sex lonely pussy-73

English women sex lonely pussy

Women are nearly twice as likely than men to have anxiety, and it leaves many with a constant feeling of fear and insecurity that makes normal, everyday activities a challenge - even sex.

Anxiety can be treated through counselling, medication, therapy, communication, and lots of other methods.

And according to Oxford University researcher Brian Earp, a diminished libido doesn't have to spell disaster.“Well, to be brief, yes SSRI-based antidepressants can have an adverse effect on libido for both men and women,” he says.

“Changes libido can be good or bad depending on the person's starting point, their relationship values, their sexual preferences and so on – so it's not as simple as the drugs just ruin everybody's libido.” Studies have also shown that exercise may help alleviate the side effects of antidepressants in women – and that it even has the potential to restore sexual desire.

“It consumed my thoughts daily, and it made me very down and lonely.”Nicky Lidbetter, CEO of Anxiety UK, says it's important to remember anxiety isn't something you have to go through alone.

“It can feel quite daunting to open up about anxiety, but remember this is something that many people experience and is completely normal.”Anxiety can be treated in a number of ways including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, available on the NHS, which helps change the dysfunctional thinking patterns that can lead to low confidence.

From palpitations and sweating to panic attacks, we know anxiety can be a physical thing.

In some women, anxiety can lead to vaginismus – a kind of sexual dysfunction that makes the muscles of the pelvic floor involuntarily tighten, preventing a woman from having sex.“Anxiety can lead to a variety of problems such as low self-esteem, low confidence and low mood,” says Barbara Honey, a counsellor at the relationship support organisation Relate.“It can sometimes present itself as a sexual dysfunction such as vaginismus which is often linked to fear and anxiety; a disorder of desire where it could be difficult to become aroused or lubricated or any pain related dysfunction.”Olivia realised something was wrong when she lost her virginity at 22. He didn't understand why it was so difficult to get his penis in, or why it was so painful,” she says.“Again and again, I tried different sexual partners, but it was just too painful. I became convinced that I would never be able to have sex and avoided relationships because I was scared they would leave me once they realised I was faulty.”After confiding in a friend, Olivia found out she had vaginismus.

Her doctor referred her to cognitive behavioural therapy, a kind of talking therapy that can help people with anxiety by changing the way they think.

“I was able to begin to take control of my life,” Olivia says.

“While my anxiety is still very much there, I'm in a situation now where I can talk to my partner about it.“What I hate is that you should not need to be in a relationship to cope with anxiety affecting your sex life.

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